This Week’s Good Reads

morning paperHere’s this week’s collection of interesting articles from around the web:

1. “An Accidental Feminist?” by Carl Trueman

This is an unfortunate title, because it’s not really true nor relevant to the blog itself. Rather, this wonderfully written and challenging blog explores the difference between a Biblical complimentarian the silliness that often passes for it. Trueman suggests that three things happen when you extrapolate the issue of male-female complementarity from the specific realms of church and home. Read the article and find out how Trueman sees things. I think he is spot on when he writes about this. We have allowed this conversation to drift from Scripture and as a result have devolved into all kinds of nonsense, sort of like this piece.

2. “Above All Earthly Metaphors” by Courtney Reissig

A wonderful review and interaction with Lauren Winner’s thoughtful new book. Reissig applauds Winner on her development, but holds off on full affirmation of her content. After having read the review I am intrigued to read the book itself.

3. “Interview: LGBT Youth and Homelessness” by Spiritual Friendship

This is a real eye-opening interview with “Kelley Cutler, a Catholic social worker and advocate on homelessness who has worked in San Francisco for over a decade.” It shows the disproportionate rate of LGBT youth who are homeless and other homeless individuals. There’s much that we can learn about the church’s role in helping and assisting these young men and women, and much we need to consider as we weigh how to love those who come out to us.

4. “Mere Christianity Meets Mainstream Science” by Greg Cootsona

An interesting piece in The Huffington Post that challenges churches, youth groups, and college ministries to speak more openly and honestly about the relationship between science and faith. Cootsona asserts, quoting John Paul II, “Science can purify religion from error and superstition. Religion can purify science from idolatry and false absolutes.” He cites C.S. Lewis as his inspiration and talks about his own work to promote the balanced relationship. The Science vs. Religion trope is very tired and simply not true. There are a great number of brilliant scientists who hold to the Christian faith, and, more recently, Alvin Plantinga has written compellingly on their co-existence.

5. “Gay Teens Have Higher Rates of Pregnancy Than Straight Teens” by Joe Carter

Carter reports here for TGC on some very counterintuitive studies that found Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Questioning teens have the highest percentage of teen pregnancies. There are number of potential reasons for that, and Carter goes over those as well. But one important matter to consider, as he concludes, is the present ministries church can have in the lives of these young people. It’s much broader than we tend to think. I appreciated this line from Joe: Over the past few years evangelical churches have made great strides in learning how to minister to those with same-sex attraction. But there is much more we could do for teens who identify as gay, lesbian, and bisexual.

6. “That ‘Useless’ Liberal Arts Degree Has Become Tech’s Hottest Ticket” by George Anders

As someone who did their undergraduate in English I found this exploration fascinating. Anders examines the rise of the non-techies in the tech industry. I recall Daniel Pink making this case as early as 2005 in his well written and insightful book A Whole New Mind. It seems we are now seeing the future he predicted.

7. “4 Biblical Compass Points for Gospel Conversations” by Robert Kelleman

In anticipation of his new book Gospel Conversations, Bob gives us some help in having those gospel conversations with our counselees. This is a good read for counselors and can whet our appetite for the new book.

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