This Week’s Good Reads

morning paperEvery week I compile a list of interesting articles from around the web, here’s this week’s list. There’s bound to be something interesting here for you:

1. “The Fight for Thin is Making Us Spiritually Weak” by Krista Dunham

I know I am biased, but this is a great piece on the danger of pursuing a certain kind of body image. My lovely wife, who admits her own struggle with this for years, writes an informed piece here about the pursuit of a certain waist line as a form of idolatry. It’s a worthy read, friends.

2. “Asking Good Questions About Mental Illness” by Brad Hamberick

Counselor Brad Hamberick is starting a wonderful series reflecting on mental illness. He states the motivation for this series upfront very clearly, he writes:

When engaging a difficult and highly personal subject, it is better to start with good questions than a list of answers. The better our questions are, the more responsibly we will utilize the answers of which we are confidant, the more humbly we will approach areas of uncertainty, and the more we will honor one another in the process of learning.

This is a great series and worthy of your reading, especially if you are a counselor. Check out all IV parts.

3. “The Silence of Jesus and the Voice of the Apostles” by Wesley Hill

Marilynne Robinson stirred up some disappointment in a recent interview she gave, particularly as she spoke about the issue of same-sex marriage. In this short piece over at First Things Wesley Hill explains why her reasoning is so poor and simplistic, essentially he argues that she misunderstands the relationship between Jesus’ teachings and those of the apostles after Him.

4. “What Marilynne Robinson Could Learn From Herself” by Marybeth Davis Baggett

Speaking of Robinson’s distressing interview, my friend Marybeth has written a thoughtful reflection here at Christ and Pop Culture. She explores, in particular, the distinction between Marilynne’s voice in her writings and the simplistic views represented in her interview. In other words, Robinson could learn something from her own writings.

5. “The Gospel and Our Stories” by Dave Dunham

This is my latest piece for The Southern Ohio Pastors Coalition, here addressing how hearing the gospel in and through the stories of others brings freshness to the gospel for ourselves. I reflect here on several baptismal testimonies we had at our church a few weeks back, and how each story was a beautiful reminder of and picture of the gospel of grace.

6. “What We All Agree On, and What We (Probably) Don’t, In this Sanctification Debate” by Kevin DeYoung

DeYoung and Tullian Tchividjian  have been debating sanctification for some time. They’ve drawn some others into the debate as well, but here DeYoung tries to identify the points of disagreement by looking at a series of questions that are most likely being answered very differently. This is an important discussion and I think DeYoung hits the nail on the head with these questions.

7. “The Church Needs More Tattoos” by Russell D. Moore

Moore writes a good piece here about the need for the church to go after and attract people who don’t look like they fit the typical church family photo. A good piece that connects well a piece I wrote over at The Gospel Coalition on Recovery Culture churches. I hope that this represents a new trend in the church.

8. “The Fauxtopia of Detroit’s Suburbs” by James D. Griffioen

In this select essay from a new upcoming book on Detroit the author contrasts Detroit suburbs with downtown. He paints the suburbs more akin to the faux utopia of Greenfield Village than to the actual city of Detroit. This is an interesting read, if clearly full of some bias.

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